News & Insights

VICTORIA PREPARES FOR ARRIVAL OF DRIVERLESS VEHICLES

24 October 2018 – Driverless and zero emissions vehicles are fast becoming a reality for modern society with governments and peak infrastructure industry bodies realising the need for considered future planning.

Just last week Infrastructure Victoria released its Advice on Automated and Zero Emissions Vehicles Infrastructure report, calling on both the private sector and the state government to better prepare to state’s infrastructure to ensure it is ready to realise the potential the new technology will offer.

Infrastructure Victoria says the report is the most comprehensive body of evidence in this area in Australia, and possibly the world, and is a result of an intensive 12 months of evidence gathering, analysis and consultation which included specialist reports across ten areas covering the potential sequencing, timing and scope of infrastructure delivery.

According to Infrastructure Victoria CEO Michel Masson, the peak body’s research suggests that driverless and zero emissions vehicles have the potential to “reduce traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions, dramatically improve access to services, avoid car accidents caused by human error and add almost $15 billion per year to the economy.”

To be ready, Infrastructure Victoria believes significant investment from both government and the private sector will be required, mapping out key considerations including; up to $1.7 billion to upgrade mobile networks; around $250 million for improved line markings on roads; and at least $2.2 billion for energy network upgrades.

“Government can take action right now to get Victoria ready for new vehicle technologies,” Project Director Dr Allison Stewart said.

“Integrating on-demand and mobility as a service into the public transport mix and sharing our transport data in real-time could support our transport system and attract new and innovative companies and services to Victoria.

“Allowing flexibility in our planning regime to make it easier for people to charge their electric vehicles could also have an immediate impact,” Dr Stewart said.